Crofton Park History Books

There appear to be no dedicated Crofton Park History Books, but History of the Borough of Lewisham, first published in 1908 and recently republished by FamLoc, covers what was then the Metropolitan Borough of Lewisham, formed in 1900. The book includes Lewisham, Lee, Catford, Crofton Park, Hither Green, Forest Hill, Bellingham, Rushey Green, Southend, Honor Oak, part of Blackheath, part of Brockley, and part of Sydenham.
The book is rich in the origins of street names and places, and includes much information on churches, topography, notable events, people of influence, and much more.
73 photographs and illustrations are included, making it invaluable for the local and family historian.

History of the Borough of Lewisham, by Leland L. Duncan

This book was first published in 1908, and covers the geographic area of what was then the Metropolitan Borough of Lewisham, formed in 1900, and includes Lewisham, Lee, Catford, Hither Green, Forest Hill, Bellingham, Rushey Green, Southend, Honor Oak, part of Blackheath, part of Brockley, and part of Sydenham. It is a history of those places, and not a history of the borough.
The book covers the history from ancient times up to 1908. It is rich in the origins of street names and places, and includes much information on churches, topography, notable events, people of influence, and much more. 73 excellent photographs and illustrations are included, making it invaluable for the local historian, family historian, and others with a connection to the places mentioned.
This FamLoc edition is a slight modification; there have been changes to format and some punctuation. However, the grammar and prose has been faithfully retained, other than changes to a handful of typographical errors and the very few instances where clarity was required.

Click HERE or on the image to buy History of the Borough of Lewisham online.

 

 

The following is an extract from History of the Borough of Lewisham:

A lane ran nearly on the site of Crofton Park Road, and came out into Brockley Road, not far from the farm. The remainder was open country, with woods stretching over the whole of Honor Oak, from the borders of Surrey down to Brockley Road and up Brockley Hill. The woods have long since disappeared, and streets are fast covering the fields.
Adelaide Road is built on part of the Bridge House estates, the trustees of which gave the site for St. Cyprian’s Church, built in 1901. Ivy Lane, which bounds the northern side of the Cemetery, is an ancient right of way which appears on the maps of 1745. The history of the site of the Cemetery has already been given. Further along the Brockley Road is Crofton Park Station, on the Nunhead and Shortlands Railway, which has given its name (a modern one) to the surrounding roads.
A word must be said of the “Brockley Jack,” once an old-world, wayside, wooden hostelry, which is said to have been frequented by Dick Turpin and other highwaymen, and, since in those days there was scarcely a house in Brockley Lane (as it was then called) from Stanstead (Stonystreet) Lane to New Cross, it must have been an ideal spot as a rendezvous. In the Enclosure Award of 1810 it is styled the “Brockley Castle,” and then stood on Brockley Green, which was enclosed by the Act of Parliament of that year.

 

We are always looking for more Crofton Park history books to include on this page, and welcome suggestions

Click here for the Crofton Park History and Family History main page


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